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AMH-01, “Code talkers” Native American, Code taker with Body Guard. WWII – US Marines at Iwo Jima, (2pcs).

$79.50
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Individual figure view.

 
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Individual figure view.

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Code Talkers

      The Code Talkers also known as Windtalkers were Native Americans that used their native language to talk and transmit information on tactics, troop movements, orders and other vital battlefield information by telegraphs or radios during combat. The first Code Talkers were from the Choctaw Nation which was recruited in World War 1 to use their language to transmit messages. There were 18. In the late 1940, the first code talker was recruited for peace time maneuvers but never expanded beyond this point. They were Comanche. 

      The US Marine Corp enlisted about 300 code talkers in the beginning of WWII. There ranks exceeded 400 during the course of the war and served in all six Marine Divisions from 1942 to 1945. There were trained as infantry fighting men but their main duty was to stick with the communications duties. 

      The most famous of the Code talkers were the Navajo soldiers who served in World War II, principally, in the Pacific theater which saw some of the toughest fighting of the war. The Japanese were very good in breaking our codes. The difficult Navajo tongue in communications was impossible to decipher by the Japanese. The code took Native words and assigned to more than 450 frequently used military terms. The Code Talkers could receive and translate messages faster than using the standard military codes which took up to 30 minutes to translate. The Code Talkers could provide instant coded messages. Because of this, lives were saved and battles strategy was improved. The Marines may have never taken Iwo Jima if it wasn’t for the code talkers.  

      No Code Talker was ever captured. Each pair or single Code Talker was assigned a bodyguard. He was an NCO with the duty to protect the Code and protect them from being mistaken for Japanese. However, the life of a code talker was not as important as the code itself. Only after the war did the Code Talker find out that their bodyguards had orders to shoot them if captured but the military denies this order. 

      The Code Talkers were kept a secret after WWII for 25 years in case they hade to be used again. The Code Talkers were finally honored for their war efforts in 2002 by receiving 29 Congressional Gold Medals and 318 Silver Medals.

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